The Lowell is conveniently situated near Fifth Avenue and Central Park on the Upper East Side. Offering 74 rooms and suites with cashmere throws, king-sized beds and pantries or kitchenettes stocked with Dean & DeLuca snacks, this boutique property also features an array of drinking and dining venues, including the elegant Majorelle, the oak-paneled Jacques Bar and the cozy Club Room. And no visit to the No. 2 Best Hotel in New York City would be complete without sitting for afternoon tea in the Pembroke Room. (Courtesy of The Lowell Hotel New York)
This meticulously resorted Victorian manse set on 34 acres of Scottish woodlands first made headlines in 2014, when it was acquired by none other than tennis star Andy Murray, who hails from this part of Perthshire. Yet you'll find almost no trace of the pro here other than his fondness for this nook of the Highlands. Famed French chef Albert Roux runs the kitchen at Chez Roux at Cromlix, offering up elegant French-meets-Scottish food. There is also a whiskey room where guests can kick back and enjoy a number of different Scottish whiskies, as well as rooms for private dining. As with any Scottish estate, it's all about the daytime activities. Cromlix offers tennis coaching on their own Wimbledon-grade courts (of course), loch fishing, archery, garden games, and falconry.
The No. 2 Best Hotel in New York City exudes a serene, elegant ambiance, further enhanced by its calming gold and cream color scheme. Perched on the Upper East Side, just a few blocks from Fifth Avenue's sleek storefronts, The Lowell New York provides travelers with easy access to iconic city sights and stores. The boutique property also impresses visitors with its impeccably decorated rooms and spacious marble bathrooms, its attentive staff and afternoon tea. (Courtesy of The Lowell New York)
Just two blocks from the Plaza de Armas, this 16th-century colonial-style mansion has been thoughtfully updated with intelligent oxygen enrichment systems, heated floors, and hot tubs in 43 suites. Wellbeing and cuisine are among the standouts here, but it's not just about how you feel—it's what you see, too. The hotel houses more than 300 pieces of art, including paintings from the Cuzco school, carvings, and sculptures, so make time to take a lap (or three).
Long before the influx of American billionaires preparing for the apocalypse by constructing mega-million-dollar retreats in the remotest reaches of New Zealand, there was the Lodge at Kauri Cliffs. American hedge-fund billionaire Julian Robertson created this hotel on a 6,000-acre working sheep farm set above the Pacific Ocean. For golfers, it offers the round of a lifetime. Created by late, great course designer, David Harmon, 15 of the 18 holes look out across the ocean, while six play alongside cliffs which drop 200 metres into the sea. Tee-offs require blind hits of faith across coastal chasms. But Robertson’s vision was hardly limited to golfers. There’s a day spa built within a native forest, and sunset barbecues on Friday evenings on the property’s pink-sand beach; more formal suppers are served inside the main lodge, which is designed to feel like a traditional farmhouse (albeit one which requires guests wear jackets for dinner). A farm-to-table ethos rules the kitchen, fresh produce from the sea and surrounding farms dictates daily changes to a menu regarded as northern New Zealand’s finest. Spacious rooms are neutral-toned and comfortable – fancy elements would be negated by the elevated views out to the Cavalli Islands. Those seeking even more space should try the 4,200-square-feet Owner’s Cottage, and then wander around the property, through ancient Kauri woodland, and down trails onto deserted white-sand bays where orcas and whales pass by. By Craig Tansley
The individual lists were sent to Janice Tober, executive editor of Hotel-Addict.com. "There were some hotels we all agreed should be on the list; others, we discussed and, yes, there was even some cajoling involved as we stood up for our favourites," said Tober. "The process was intensive and included looking at numerous readers' suggestions. It took us several weeks of careful review before we created the best 50."

The Hôtel du Vieux-Québec is both TripAdvisor’s number one hotel as well as one of the most eco-friendly hotels in the city, with its own beehives. That trend extends to its new restaurant, Le Tournebroche, which specializes in cooking local organic foods. The hotel offers free walking tours of Old Québec during the summer. In the warmer months, stop by the rooftop garden; when it’s cold outside, go down to the basement for a selection of games and movies. Homemade breakfast baskets add to the cozy and comfortable feeling.
While the Fairmont Pacific Rim features a long list of luxurious amenities, its downtown Vancouver location is what helps it stand apart from competitors. Set on the Coal Harbour waterfront, the hotel sits across the street from the Canada Place cruise ship terminal. Thanks to the hotel's location, recent guests say the views from the rooms and rooftop are spectacular. When you're not gazing out across the harbor, relax poolside in one of the private cabanas or by one of the cozy outdoor fire pits. For even more serenity, visitors recommend booking a treatment at the Willow Stream Spa. Continue the pampering at Botanist, which serves regionally sourced dishes. Craving a pick-me-up? Venture to giovane cafe + wine bar, which offers house-made pastries for breakfast and Italian cuisine for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Once you've refueled, retreat to your digs where you'll find a Stearns & Foster bed, an iPod docking station and an iPad2, which you can use to order room service and operate various controls in the guest room. Although this Fairmont's high-tech amenities are an added perk, according to recent visitors, it's the hotel's exceptional service that makes a stay here memorable.
Felicité, the fifth-biggest island in the Seychelles, is widely considered to be one of its most beautiful. Giant granite boulders lie scattered atop curvaceous hills like remnants of a gods’ pétanque match. Blue pigeons coo and roost in jungly vegetation. The sand is so powdery and pristine that it squeaks as you scuttle into the clear aquamarine shallows. And within all this almost-otherworldly natural splendour is a man-made retreat that is almost as pretty – and equally as green (how many other islands have solar-power panels, a reverse-osmosis plant and a patch of land for an organic kitchen garden?). The 30 glass-fronted rooms are set among boulders and trees, with wide decks and plunge pools outside, and polished wooden floors and furnishings in the hues of the sea inside. At the beach bar, giant hammocks are strung over the ocean from which to sip passionfruit Mojitos and mango ice-lollies. At breakfast, there are green smoothies, rainbow-coloured fruit platters and oysters; at night it’s French Champagne and fire-cooked lobster, followed by rum tastings in a cosy bar. In between all this taste-bud tantalising, there are hills to hike, reefs to dive around and palm trees to lie under and contemplate the delightful symmetry of a crab’s tracks or the puffiness of a cloud. There’s a spa amid boulders by the sea, and a yoga platform where an instructor leads daily sun salutations as dawn breaks. A private-island game-changer. By Lisa Grainger
The stunning Harbour Town area is a great place to station yourself during a Hilton Head trip. And its standout accommodations, The Inn & Club at Harbour Town (part of The Sea Pines Resort), is certainly one of the most popular resorts on the island. Guests who choose to make the (somewhat long) trek here delight in the lush scenery, the luxurious rooms and the professional, approachable and welcoming staff. Rooms come with large flat-screen TVs, blackout-lined window treatments and spacious bathrooms with soaking tubs and Molton Brown toiletries. Visitors like to venture out of the hotel to eat (particularly at The Quarterdeck, one of Hilton Head's favorites), but most insist that you stick close to home for Sunday brunch. Harbour Town rests in the bottom boot of Hilton Head Island.
The No. 3 Best Hotel in Maui boasts epic views of Molokai Island and spacious rooms that all feature lanais. Travelers flock to this hotel because of its secluded perch away from bustling Lahaina. On-site, guests have access to several restaurants, an expansive pool area and a spa. Plus, the beach is just a short walk from the hotel. (Courtesy of The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua)
According to recent visitors, the best thing about the Trump International Hotel & Tower New York is the service, from its white-gloved bellhops to its personal 24-hour Trump Attaché service. Along with the attentive hotel staff, the spacious accommodations, the 6,000-square-foot spa and the world-class cuisine served at the on-site restaurants also earn praise from guests. This Trump property earns the No. 6 Best Hotel in New York City title for 2017. (Courtesy of Trump International Hotel & Tower New York)

**Le Club AccorHotels members who register and book the Fairmont Moments offer by February 28, 2019,  and stay between January 1 and March 31, 2019,  will receive triple the Rewards points for their stay. Guests must register before making their reservation to be eligible to receive the discount. Offer only applicable in Canada, USA, Mexico and Panama. For more details click here.

This isn’t your typical farm. It’s owned by Eleven Experience, the Colorado-based high-end adventure-travel outfit that is one of the most interesting of its kind in the world right now. It has two helipads, an indoor-outdoor, swim-through geo-thermally heated pool, a bar with a pool table and drumkit, and a dining room with floor-to-ceiling windows, modern art and sweeping views. In fact, there’s really nothing typical about Deplar, among the mountains on Iceland’s remote Troll Peninsula, a place of severe beauty. It’s got some of the best heli-skiing and fishing right at its doorstep. You can roll out of bed and chopper up to the top of a snow-covered volcano which, in all likelihood, no one has ever skied before, zipping through fields dotted with tiny horses that look like toys and finishing your run on the Arctic beach, where, if you do not mind the chill, you can simply kick off your skis and go fishing (then hightail it to the spa to recuperate in a flotation pod). It’s the sort of trip that confers bragging rights back home, from a company that understands such hyper-adventurous yet modern-luxe impulses perfectly. It has an expanding empire of properties and boats in North America, the Caribbean and Europe devoted to these fast/slow, winter/summer outdoorsy pursuits. But Deplar Farm is a standout. The air is pure, the snow powdery and in the summertime the salmon-rich rivers flow clear, fast and free. By Steve King
DH Lawrence penned a love letter about it, Mussolini held court during the war, Churchill was moved to get out his watercolours and his memory lives on in the ancient resident cat of the same name that slinks around picking up titbits of the Michelin-starred food. This peachy-pink palazzo on the still waters of Lake Garda has been stealing hearts since the 1890s, and at the turn of the millennium, it was opened as a hotel, the loveliest in all of Italy. But what makes it so special are all the non-hotel bits: the exquisite antiques everywhere, the silver photo frames filled with black-and-white family shots, the engraved tumblers of fresh roses, the deep bath tubs, and the circus-striped umbrellas by the charcoal-grey slick of swimming pool. Helicopters land on the pristinely manicured croquet lawn and return guests arrive to a fanfare of hugs and kisses, pats on backs. They come here to feast like kings at night on plates of tortellini carbonara, spend the day lolling fatly by the pool watching the ducks and the windsurfers pootle past, and sleep outrageously well under frescoed ceilings in beds made up with crisp, scallop-edged Frette linen. Steep mountains provide a dramatic backdrop for the garden, and early mornings are particularly magic, the silvery pale ethereal light drifting across the lake. The feel of the place is old-school, spick and span, timeless, a bit matronly – and for anyone who likes a bit of Great Gatsby-style cosseting, it’s a dreamy retreat. By Issy von Simson
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