Kata Beach Resort& Spa is a 275-room four-star resort located on one of the most picturesque beaches in Phuket - Kata.Designed in classic Thai lines with a grand open lobby, the resort goes in for bold lines, high ceilings, grandiose restaurants and a stylish seaside look and feel to it.The aptly named Atrium Coffee Shop & Terrace serves breakfast with all-day dining consisting of international and Thai cuisine and has live music in the evenings while Peppino Italian Restaurant and Pub will serve up tasty Italian delights.The Poolside Bar is perhaps the most photogenic place in the resort with its heady mix of turquoise pool, tropical foliage, and sea views and it stays open until 23:30 while there is a good selection of cakes and patisseries at the Coffee mill next to the Atrium outlet. Read More...

To arrive here in the dark, through deserts and date trees and mountain passes, is to be greeted by a multitude of twinkling lights from the clear starry skies and from the dim lanterns that illuminate the stone houses. This far-flung hotel lies sandwiched between the dramatic Hajar Mountains and the warm seas off the northern Musandam Peninsula in the Sultanate of Oman. Reimagined to form a traditional village, each villa has a private pool, reed ceilings, rough stucco walls and lamps suspended on ropes that reflect in the thick wood-framed mirrors. Outside, though, through the dense surrounding stands of palm, is a full-on luxe seaside hotel, with a pristine talcum-fine beach and a magnificent swimming pool set against a backdrop of towering pink peaks. Not surprising, given it’s a Six Senses, many people come here for the spa and its bespoke programmes of treatments and fitness. More unusual is the opportunity for adventure. Those who want maximum drama should paraglide, starting on a ledge 293 metres up at the top of the Zighy summit to float down over the bay. The food is worth the journey alone: Bedouin cooking at Shua Shack; wagu-beef fritters in the mountain-lair-like Sense on the Edge. Breakfasts of Arabic coffee and dishes such as akawi, labneh and zaatar-sprinkled pittas are excellent fuel for a morning of beachcombing for the cowrie shells that dazzle here – perfectly polished with a dusting of dark freckles. Six Senses is a growing group but what it does so brilliantly is stay rooted in the sense of each place and let the surroundings shine. By Mary Lussiana
Nouvo City Hotel is a four star hotel based in a quiet area of old town Bangkok, but still walking distance to the attractions of the areas.This modern hotel has 110 rooms and has a boutique feel where guests are treated personally and diligently by English speaking staff.Located on Samsen Road, a place popular for artists, painters and musicians, places of interest include the Phra Sumen Fort, Santichaiprakarn Park, and Phra Atit Pier that can transport guests to the BTS Skytrain Station in ten traffic-jam-free minutes.The hotel also provides a free tuk-tuk shuttle service to two separate shopping malls: Siam Discovery and Platinum Fashion Mall. Read More...
With a prime beachfront location and a first-rate staff, the Acqualina Resort & Spa on the Beach continually impresses guests. The property has four pools surrounded by palm trees, lounge chairs and umbrellas that overlook the shore and offer poolside food and beverage service. What's more, all of the accommodations are equipped with terraces, a traveler favorite. The resort is the No. 1 Best Hotel in Miami Beach for 2017. (Courtesy of Acqualina Resort & Spa on the Beach)
Owned by actor Robert De Niro, Tribeca's Greenwich Hotel is best known for offering trendy digs with an international flair. All of the hotel's 88 rooms and suites feature Tibetan silk rugs, English leather settees and Moroccan-tiled or Italian Carrara marble bathrooms – details that impressed previous guests. Facilities found on-site include a spa, an indoor pool and a fitness center. Plus, visitors can savor Italian classics in Locanda Verde's dining room or the Drawing Room's courtyard. The property is the No. 5 Best Hotel in New York City for 2018. (Courtesy of The Greenwich Hotel)
The 50 individually designed rooms at this boutique hotel within the White City (a Tel Aviv neighborhood known for its collection of Bauhaus buildings, as well as for art galleries and designer boutiques) are spread between two historic townhouses—23 and 25 Nachmani Street, respectively—which are divided by a fragrant citrus garden. There’s a rooftop infinity pool, a 1940s-style Library Bar, a formal French-Mediterranean brasserie, and an excellent Izakaya-style Japanese restaurant—so you won't want for activity (or sustenance) while you're here.
With its charming and peaceful streets, chic boutique hotels, and relaxed atmosphere, today’s Quebec City has certainly changed since its original incarnation as a defensive fort during the Revolutionary War. Today’s only invaders are peaceful and excited tourists, visiting what is often considered North America’s most European city. With cobbled streets, delightful architecture and a certain joie de vivre, Quebec City is often associated with French cities and towns.

Jeff Finley took this photo of Balanced Rock. It is one the few unique rock formations in Arches National Park that is highly visible from the road. It's a little over nine miles from the park's visitor center. Even though you can see it from the road, get out of the car and walk the short 0.3 mile trail around the rock formation to really appreciate the ball atop its 55-foot base (128 feet tall overall.)


This Russian River Valley boutique hotel was a big winner in the inn and small lodges category, perhaps because it embodies the ultimate wine-country escape: a Michelin-starred restaurant, an on-site winery, and tastefully homey rooms (some housed in a posh version of a barn). But even the down-home touches have a serious pedigree: the lobby offers a selection of help-yourself artisanal soap, and the outdoor s’mores pit features house-made marshmallows and Vahlrona chocolate. Even if you don’t normally seek out food on a stick, the hotel placed at No. 4 in the U.S. for dining.

Travelers love the elegant Mediterranean-style facade and ample amenities available at the Fairmont Grand Del Mar, the No. 1 Best Hotel in San Diego. Situated about 20 miles north of San Diego amid Los Peñasquitos Canyon Preserve, the hotel offers a golf course, an award-winning spa, a palm tree-lined pool and multiple dining options. What's more, guests rave about the spacious accommodations and the friendly employees, from the bell staff and the valet to the concierges and the restaurant servers. (Courtesy of Fairmont Grand Del Mar)
Back when this hotel opened in 1995, there were few places in the Maldives to rival it. Landing here by seaplane felt like arriving at an escape cast out at the edge of the world. These days, neighbouring lights are aplenty, but this pristine paradise still feels wild enough to instil excitement. The groundbreaking barefoot ethos created by husband-and-wife owners Sonu and Eva Shivdasani ensures immediate surrender. Explore the island by bike, stopping to bob, chat, and giggle in the warm ocean for hours. Seventy rustic, thatched-roof villas, each hidden in the jungle shade (no stilts over water here) are designed with pared-back simplicity: natural tones, soft textures, lots of driftwood. Each comes with the softest organic sheets, huge daybeds, private pools, hammocks, and a sound system on which to blare out Nat King Cole. There’s snorkelling, scuba diving, surfing trips, and treatments in the spa (tension-soothing massages with lemongrass oil, rose-crystal lymphatic facials, a touch of Ayurveda). At the forward-thinking art studio, wine bottles are upcycled into sculptures. Food is central, with enough sushi to sink a ship, epic make-your-own salad bars, addictive egg appam, an ice cream parlour, a cheese room, and the new Out of the Blue restaurant, with slides straight into the sea. No wonder everybody here is beaming. One of the first luxe–but–laid-back hotels to open in the Indian Ocean, Fushi still delivers on fresh, cool charisma. By Daisy Finer
‘Coûte que coûte’ goes the punning family motto of Sir Charles Coote, for whom the opulent Ballyfin estate was conceived in the early 19th century. ‘No matter the cost’ is how this loosely translates, proving as apt an adage in the 21st century as it was then. Many millions of euros may have been lavished on this stately pile in County Laois, both in its original construction and, more recently, its painstaking restoration. For the architectural historian, the house is a head turner – the culmination of Regency craftsmanship brought together in lusciously modelled plasterwork, scagliola in varying colours, stained glass and staggeringly intricate parquetry. For the sybarite, the house is a place of comfort and grandeur, not least in the Gold Drawing Room where walls are hung with lustrous silk and vast windows frame views of the 28-acre lake. Bedrooms are also decorated with rich fabrics and wallpaper, fine antiques, fresh flowers from the garden, art and books – a fabulous amalgamation of Anglo-Irish panache. New this year is Ballyfin’s 21st room and first standalone property: the tiny Gardener’s Cottage overlooking, to the rear, the walled gardens, which supply Ballyfin’s kitchen with organic fruit and vegetables. The grounds are made for strolling in the complimentary wellies, with grottoes and rockeries, a folly and a fernery, a rose garden and an aviary. There is no finer Irish-country house experience. By Pamela Goodman
Like other properties near Park City, Utah, Montage Deer Valley appeals to winter sports enthusiasts. All guests staying at the No. 1 Best Hotel in Park City will have access to ski concierge services and ski-in/ski-out access in addition to a bowling alley, an outdoor swimming pool and a 35,000-square-foot spa, among other year-round amenities. Travelers can also grab a bite to eat at one of five on-site restaurants before retiring to their spacious accommodations, which offer walk-in closets, private balconies or patios, fireplaces and marble bathrooms with deep-soaking tubs and heated floors. (Courtesy of Montage Deer Valley)
Rodeo Drive's world-renowned shops are only steps away from the Montage Beverly Hills, making this Preferred Hotels & Resorts outpost an ideal option for shoppers. Aside from its enviable address, former guests praised the hotel's on-site amenities, which range from a rooftop pool to a spa to a barbershop. The rooms are also well-appointed, offering tablets, free Wi-Fi access and separate showers and bathtubs. These features, plus industry awards from AAA, Forbes and Fodor's, helped the Montage Beverly Hills claim the title of No. 4 Best Hotel in Los Angeles for 2018. (Courtesy of Montage Beverly Hills)
The 50 individually designed rooms at this boutique hotel within the White City (a Tel Aviv neighborhood known for its collection of Bauhaus buildings, as well as for art galleries and designer boutiques) are spread between two historic townhouses—23 and 25 Nachmani Street, respectively—which are divided by a fragrant citrus garden. There’s a rooftop infinity pool, a 1940s-style Library Bar, a formal French-Mediterranean brasserie, and an excellent Izakaya-style Japanese restaurant—so you won't want for activity (or sustenance) while you're here.
The No. 1 Best Hotel in Los Angeles has been a fixture on the Hollywood entertainment scene for years. A haven for celebrities and the inspiration behind The Eagles' hit song "Hotel California," this Beverly Hills property exudes Old Hollywood glamour inside its guest rooms and suites. All accommodations offer garden or city views, Bang & Olufsen televisions, minibars and marble-accented bathrooms with separate showers and bathtubs. Guests are also treated to chic on-site amenities like an outdoor pool with underwater music, a polo-inspired lounge and a spa that hosts complimentary yoga classes. (Courtesy of The Beverly Hills Hotel)
Located in Quebec City, 200 yards from Fairmont Le Chateau Frontenac, Hotel Manoir Morgan has a terrace and rooms with free WiFi access. We were delighted with Manoir Morgan. It was a quiet oasis right in the heart of the busy historic area. The staff were all helpful and friendly and the rooms were very comfortable - huge beds! Windows opened when required and there was a Nespresso machine in the rooms. Breakfast next door was also excellent.
The No. 1 Best Hotel in Vermont also happens to be one of its most unique. Situated on 300 acres of farmland in Barnard, Vermont, this adults-only, all-inclusive property features a spa, a pub and just 20 accommodations equipped with fireplaces and separate showers and bathtubs. Additionally, all guests have access to complimentary laundry service, minifridge snacks and packing and unpacking services, plus daily breakfast, lunch, dinner and alcoholic beverages at the on-site restaurant are included in the room rate. Activities, such as canoeing and kayaking, fly-fishing, tennis and snowshoeing, are also covered. (Courtesy of Twin Farms) 

The Hôtel le Clos Saint-Louis offers a romantic experience in old Québec City. The ambiance is cozy and the décor honors the building’s history: this is a former pair of Victorian houses renovated into a small boutique hotel. As the building is historic, ask for a ground floor room if you have mobility issues; there is no elevator. The rooms all come with a tea service set and are also decorated in Victorian-inspired furniture. The Hôtel le Clos Saint-Louis also specializes in romantic packages for couples, ensuring a true taste of Québec City’s culture.

The romantic 261-room Ritz-Carlton Half Moon Bay serves the Ritz-Carlton name well, offering stunning rooms, a large spa, and beautiful bay views. Perched on a cliff overlooking the Pacific, the hotel has excellent outdoor facilities including fire pits facing the ocean and a manicured 18-hole golf course. Rooms are spacious and elegant, yet simple, with beautiful marble bathrooms and quaint shutters covering the windows. Fire pit rooms come with -- you guessed it -- cozy outdoor fire pits looking out over the rocky coast.


‘Coûte que coûte’ goes the punning family motto of Sir Charles Coote, for whom the opulent Ballyfin estate was conceived in the early 19th century. ‘No matter the cost’ is how this loosely translates, proving as apt an adage in the 21st century as it was then. Many millions of euros may have been lavished on this stately pile in County Laois, both in its original construction and, more recently, its painstaking restoration. For the architectural historian, the house is a head turner – the culmination of Regency craftsmanship brought together in lusciously modelled plasterwork, scagliola in varying colours, stained glass and staggeringly intricate parquetry. For the sybarite, the house is a place of comfort and grandeur, not least in the Gold Drawing Room where walls are hung with lustrous silk and vast windows frame views of the 28-acre lake. Bedrooms are also decorated with rich fabrics and wallpaper, fine antiques, fresh flowers from the garden, art and books – a fabulous amalgamation of Anglo-Irish panache. New this year is Ballyfin’s 21st room and first standalone property: the tiny Gardener’s Cottage overlooking, to the rear, the walled gardens, which supply Ballyfin’s kitchen with organic fruit and vegetables. The grounds are made for strolling in the complimentary wellies, with grottoes and rockeries, a folly and a fernery, a rose garden and an aviary. There is no finer Irish-country house experience. By Pamela Goodman
The individual lists were sent to Janice Tober, executive editor of Hotel-Addict.com. "There were some hotels we all agreed should be on the list; others, we discussed and, yes, there was even some cajoling involved as we stood up for our favourites," said Tober. "The process was intensive and included looking at numerous readers' suggestions. It took us several weeks of careful review before we created the best 50."
With Ocean House's accolades, including a Forbes Five Star Award and a AAA Five Diamond Award, it's hardly surprising that visitors keep returning to the No. 1 Best Hotel in Rhode Island. Ocean House offers a quintessential New England experience with its classic architecture, local artwork and regional cuisine. Along with a muted color palette and turn-of-the-20th-century decor, each room and suite includes a flat-screen TV, an iPad, 400-thread-count linens and Molton Brown toiletries. Additionally, guests can enjoy a multitude of free amenities, including afternoon refreshments in the hotel's lobby, transportation around the town of Westerly and daily activities, such as yoga and cooking classes. (Courtesy of Ocean House)
One of the curious things about the Anassa is how tricky it is to parcel up and present. Capturing the wholeness of the place, framing its splendid size, its weighty elegance, its thrilling solidity, is challenging. It is so much more than the sum of its parts: a cracking hotel, which is at once back-straighteningly smart and also effortless. Diamonds and flip-flops. Exquisite sashimi and sticky-sweet ice-cream cones. As on the button for peace-seeking grown-ups as it is for half-term and school holiday hijinks. And because of the reliable balminess of the weather, it’s as delightful in early May as in mid-October and all the months in between. The imposing, traditional Greek Cypriot-style buildings, with their terracotta-tiled roofs, whitewashed walls and periwinkle-blue shutters, spill down to pools and rolling lawns that in turn tumble onto the beach. There is space, endless space everywhere, and wide-eyed views of the scoop of Chrysochou Bay for scuba diving straight off the shore. Hushed dinners at Asian-leaning Basiliko are followed by weekly torchlit grilled-swordfish barbecues and local folk suppers in the chapel courtyard under blousy branches of bougainvillaea. The rooms are classic and calm, pale linens, a jaunty nautical stripe, muslin curtains, and at night, with the windows flung open, all you can hear is the lick of sea on sand. After a week of sleeping, swimming, feasting and spa-ing everyone leaves feeling properly rested for the first time in months. Which is why they come back again and again. By Issy von Simson

The Hôtel le Clos Saint-Louis offers a romantic experience in old Québec City. The ambiance is cozy and the décor honors the building’s history: this is a former pair of Victorian houses renovated into a small boutique hotel. As the building is historic, ask for a ground floor room if you have mobility issues; there is no elevator. The rooms all come with a tea service set and are also decorated in Victorian-inspired furniture. The Hôtel le Clos Saint-Louis also specializes in romantic packages for couples, ensuring a true taste of Québec City’s culture.

The 50 individually designed rooms at this boutique hotel within the White City (a Tel Aviv neighborhood known for its collection of Bauhaus buildings, as well as for art galleries and designer boutiques) are spread between two historic townhouses—23 and 25 Nachmani Street, respectively—which are divided by a fragrant citrus garden. There’s a rooftop infinity pool, a 1940s-style Library Bar, a formal French-Mediterranean brasserie, and an excellent Izakaya-style Japanese restaurant—so you won't want for activity (or sustenance) while you're here.
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With a stay at Prince Palace Hotel, you'll be centrally located in Bangkok, within a 10-minute drive of Wat Saket and Wat Ratchanadda.Featured amenities include a business center, limo/town car service, and express check-in.Planning an event in Bangkok?This hotel has 31731 square feet (2948 square meters) of space consisting of conference space and a meeting room.Free valet parking is available onsite. Read More...
With Ocean House's accolades, including a Forbes Five Star Award and a AAA Five Diamond Award, it's hardly surprising that visitors keep returning to the No. 1 Best Hotel in Rhode Island. Ocean House offers a quintessential New England experience with its classic architecture, local artwork and regional cuisine. Along with a muted color palette and turn-of-the-20th-century decor, each room and suite includes a flat-screen TV, an iPad, 400-thread-count linens and Molton Brown toiletries. Additionally, guests can enjoy a multitude of free amenities, including afternoon refreshments in the hotel's lobby, transportation around the town of Westerly and daily activities, such as yoga and cooking classes. (Courtesy of Ocean House)
For travelers who put a premium on luxury, the Rosewood Hotel Georgia delivers. Recent visitors said the staff's attention to detail makes guests feel like royalty. And the 156 rooms and suites aren't too shabby either: Accommodations feature views of the hotel's inner courtyard or the Vancouver cityscape, flat-screen TVs, Nespresso coffee makers and complimentary Wi-Fi. The bathrooms are just as impressive with rainforest shower fixtures and heated floors. For extra pampering, treat yourself to a visit at Sense, A Rosewood Spa. When hunger sets in, the swanky Reflections: The Garden Terrace (open during the warmer months), serves cocktails and small plates. Meanwhile, Hawksworth Restaurant features a formal atmosphere and a menu with locally inspired cuisine. But when just drinks will do, kick back at the 1927 Lobby Lounge, which borrows its name from the building's original construction in 1927. You'll find this Rosewood outpost in downtown Vancouver at the corner of Howe and West Georgia streets (around the corner from the Vancouver Art Gallery).
There are certainly more luxe options scattered around the Ngorongoro crater area. But Gibb’s Farm, with its colonial farmhouse on the wooded slopes of the crater, built by German farmers as a coffee plantation in 1929, wins hands down on history and character. (It’s so beloved that old African hands use it for their personal family holidays.) Its cozy cottages and lush, tropical gardens make the perfect antidote to days spent on a dusty game drive.
The Covent Garden Hotel might sit in the heart of theatre-land, but it’s no drama queen. It lets other divas in town take the curtain calls. Instead, this place goes for the slow burn, revealing itself subtly and demurely. But when it does, you realise it’s a beauty. Take the first-floor Drawing Room, lined in maple wood, shiny as toffee, which originally came from the now demolished League of Nations building near Trafalgar Square. Here too are delicately limbed parlour chairs with 18th-century needlepoint embroidery and a grand old writing desk, inlaid with mother-of-pearl and holding numerous little drawers that surely concealed secret notes over the years. The honesty bar just off the nook of a library is as well stocked as a house party, meaning that nightcaps can be as late as you like. Settle into the yellow and red sofa in front of the log fire, kick off your shoes (it’s not frowned upon) and soak up the elegant yet cosy surroundings. Just as lovely is the fourth-floor Terrace Suite, up among the rooftops and chimneys of London like a Mary Poppins eyrie. Parrots peck at blousy dusty-pink flowers on the linen upholstery of the sofa and over-sized headboard and purple and teal ikat-print curtains frame the windows. In the morning, watch the sunrise over the Shard from the little wooden deck. There’s a deep bathtub for soaking in, and lavender-and-eucalyptus bathroom lotions by RikRak (a bespoke Firmdale range) that smell so good you’ll be sniffing your arm for the rest of the day. Many new names have landed in London recently, but this trouper still holds its head up high. By Grainne McBride
When a hotel opens in New York it’s not uncommon for locals to barely notice. This is, after all, a city crawling with them – big, small, modern, classic. In this town, it really takes an exceptional property, in an exceptional neighbourhood, to capture the collective consciousness. Which is exactly what happened in 2016, when The Beekman opened. First off, consider its location in the Financial District. Pre-9/11, this area catered to bankers and stockbrokers who scurried back uptown or to Westchester as soon as the market’s closing bell chimed. It was a no man’s land. Post 9/11, bars and restaurants opened and flourished; shops came; smart apartment buildings popped up. And then came the Beekman. The landmark building was built in the 1880s with a nine-storey, glass-ceiling atrium, but throughout the past century, the atrium had been covered up as the building functioned as just another office. And thank goodness, because when the property was being developed the covers were torn down, revealing the glasswork and wrought-iron railings beautifully intact. Now the glass skylight soars once again above the lobby’s Art Deco bar where New Yorkers flock to – come 6pm it’s nearly impossible to find a free bar stool. The rooms all have vintage furnishings, with dark wood floors and distressed leather headboards – they’re just what you’d want your New York apartment to feel like: comfortable but not so much so that you don’t want to leave and miss out on everything happening around you. The hotel is also home to two restaurants, Keith McNally’s bistro Augustine, a sister restaurant to the perennially hip Balthazar, and Tom Colicchio’s classic American spot Temple Court, both worthy of a dinner reservation. So many hotels like to say they’ve made the neighbourhood, but in the case of the Beekman it’s actually true. By Lauren DeCarlo
The USA is as varied as it is vast. You could bask in the bright lights of one of the world’s great cities or stargaze in the great outdoors. Embark on a road trip through wine country or find yourself in a private spa retreat. It’s a country with enough A-list sights to fill the biggest Hollywood blockbuster, but still has a down-to-earth charm that you can’t help but fall for. And, when it comes to luxury hotels, America remains one of the world’s big hitters.    
Rajasthan isn’t exactly lacking in grand heritage hotels, but there are at least two reasons to visit this property above all others. First, a section of it is still home to the former Maharaja of Jodhpur and his family (one of the largest private residences in the world) and second, for the extraordinary scale of the imposing architecture and the 26 acres of precisely manicured grounds. High on Chittar Hill, overlooking the Blue City, this golden-coloured sandstone pile has operated as a hotel since 1971, but it was the arrival of Taj Hotels in 2005 that elevated the service to match its royal setting. Art Deco interiors unfold over ornamental latticed stonework, artfully lit carved pillars, a sweeping marble staircase, exotic frescos and a neck-aching, 105-foot-high cupola. There are some pretty spectacular rooms – such as the Maharani Suite with the original bath carved from a single piece of pink Italian marble – but choose a Royal Suite for terrazzo flooring, original palace artwork and grand bathrooms leading to private balconies that frame views of the peacock-speckled gardens. A morning workout in the marble squash courts will justify a lazy afternoon in the subterranean spa, and then dinner of spice-laced Jodhpuri murgh in Risala restaurant. To stay here among the old-world opulence is to really get a flavour of Jodhpur’s gilded glory. By Lauren Ho

Travel + Leisure readers felt the same way, ranking the Rhode Island manse among the top 10 of all U.S. hotels. As part of the magazine’s annual World’s Best survey, readers ranked airlines, spas, hotels, and even islands around the globe. Within the hotel category, readers ranked properties for such features as their service, dining, family-friendliness, spas, and location. Indeed, some of the top 20 hotel winners could get away with being ho-hum on the inside, given their fabulous settings—like, along Newport’s Cliff Walk, in the shade of the Golden Gate Bridge, or on a private island overlooking Key West.
At first sight, Tetiaroa looks like a trick of the light, almost an aberration: it has a sci-fi glow. A pale blue of such luminosity, the remote, entirely private French Polynesian atoll’s water can be seen from outer space – astronauts orbiting the earth have enquired what it was. You leave from Tahiti (30 miles away, but it might be 3,000) and descend in a private six-seater directly into the Technicolor incandescence: a four-and-a-half-mile lagoon surrounded by a subterranean wall of living coral reef and circled by 12 cute green islands. Just one is used for the hotel’s 35 villas, the others solely occupied by frigate birds and ancient pandanus trees and honey bees. Tahitian royalty once lived here through the summers, prettifying their daughters for marriage, feeding them giant sea snails and sweet potato. All the islands are hemmed by white sand and shallow water rippling with baby fish. In deeper water are coral cathedrals for giant clams with mouths full of an algae in a trippy neon. The one-, two- and three-bedroom villas are decidedly more lustrous than the usual desert-island design in glass and ironwood, slate and silk. Each is set super-secretively in its own grounds, with a stretch of lonely white sand backed by dense trees. Your lazy eyes catch the occasional bright jags of oleander, jasmine, hibiscus and golden trumpet. Some guests stay put; some congregate at Bob’s Bar by the lodge’s restaurants (there are three, including a tiny new Japanese) and talk about the actor Marlon Brando, who bought Tetiaroa in 1967, having sailed past whilst scouting for locations for Mutiny on the Bounty (he even helped to develop the innovative 100 per cent renewable-energy seawater air-conditioning system here). A species of tilapia in the natural pond near the spa likes to gobble mosquito larvae: you won’t be bitten here. Best are the late afternoons, with the lulling sound of the Pacific crashing against the distant reef, waiting for the dusk, when the sky turns through the softest pastels into a stupefying heliconia red. By Antonia Quirke
There are plenty of wellness-focused hotels out there nowadays, but this private island hotel has been around longer and does it better than most. Just ask its fan club, who travel from far and wide for the daily yoga sessions, early morning meditations on the pristine beach, healing massages, and Ayurvedic consultations with Dr Parth, who hails from Goa. Check into one of the whitewashed beachfront villas simply furnished with Indonesian four-poster beds swathed in Italian linens and that’s more or less what your days will consist of – not to mention biking around the island, snorkelling expeditions, kayaking and dawdling over long feasts. The only reason to wear a watch is to make sure you don’t miss yoga. For those who prefer their Caribbean hotels a bit more hedonistic, you can always skip the green juice and slurp a Mojito at the bar, which Keith Richards has been known to frequent when he’s in residence. The Rolling Stone is just one of the island’s famous homeowners. Donna Karan has called her Balinese-inspired villa on Parrot Cay ‘a sanctuary where I go to create awareness’. Bruce Willis and Christie Brinkley own estates nearby, which can be rented should you need more space than COMO’s beachfront villas can provide. This is a wide-open, big-hearted place that puts beach life first. By Laura Itzkowitz
Hidden among fisherman’s casas painted cobalt-blue, pink and pistachio bordering Trancoso’s sleepy village square, where the town’s elders gather to shoot the breeze, Uxua is almost imperceptible to the passer-by. The only giveaway is the tables of smart Cariocas and international hipsters sipping passionfruit Caipirinhas while watching the early evening scene unfold on the Quadrado. Golden light catches the locals playing football around the whitewashed 16th-century church. This is just how expansive Dutch owner Wilbert Das (Diesel’s former creative director) likes it. Surrounded by dense rainforest and teetering high on a ridge overlooking the powder-sand fringed Atlantic, Uxua fits right into the post-hippie utopia of Trancoso. Working with local artisans, Das has turned the hotel into a collection of rustic renovated casas, cottages, an intimate treehouse and a tribal-inspired spa. All are cloaked by hummingbird-flecked tropical gardens and centred around a pool lined with green aventurine quartz, which, for those not up on their healing crystals, is said to be very therapeutic. Interiors are haute-boho: roomy indoor-outdoor sitting rooms and airy living spaces with dazzling-white walls and muslin-canopied beds, accented with lots of reclaimed wood, antiques and vintage finds including brightly painted Virgin Mary statuettes. A decked path runs through mangrove forests to the beach, where there are enormous day beds for post-breakfast snoozing and a beach bar fashioned from an old fishing boat – just stay horizontal and another Caipirinha will soon find its way to you. This is the South American coastal retreat that’s on everyone’s radar. By Chris Caldicott
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