‘Coûte que coûte’ goes the punning family motto of Sir Charles Coote, for whom the opulent Ballyfin estate was conceived in the early 19th century. ‘No matter the cost’ is how this loosely translates, proving as apt an adage in the 21st century as it was then. Many millions of euros may have been lavished on this stately pile in County Laois, both in its original construction and, more recently, its painstaking restoration. For the architectural historian, the house is a head turner – the culmination of Regency craftsmanship brought together in lusciously modelled plasterwork, scagliola in varying colours, stained glass and staggeringly intricate parquetry. For the sybarite, the house is a place of comfort and grandeur, not least in the Gold Drawing Room where walls are hung with lustrous silk and vast windows frame views of the 28-acre lake. Bedrooms are also decorated with rich fabrics and wallpaper, fine antiques, fresh flowers from the garden, art and books – a fabulous amalgamation of Anglo-Irish panache. New this year is Ballyfin’s 21st room and first standalone property: the tiny Gardener’s Cottage overlooking, to the rear, the walled gardens, which supply Ballyfin’s kitchen with organic fruit and vegetables. The grounds are made for strolling in the complimentary wellies, with grottoes and rockeries, a folly and a fernery, a rose garden and an aviary. There is no finer Irish-country house experience. By Pamela Goodman
Experience the charm and luxury of Fairmont Le Château Frontenac with our special Québec City vacation packages & special offers. Come soak up the historic ambiance, discover a romantic getaway and explore the city's rich culture. Designed with your comfort and enjoyment in mind, our packages include all of the details you need to make your stay enjoyable and help you experience Québec City to the fullest. Discover the comforts and ease of a Fairmont Le Château Frontenac package. Just select your vacation package when you make your Québec City hotel reservation at Fairmont Le Château Frontenac.
Often referred to as the USA's best small hotel, this 20-suite Relais & Châteaux property - with cottages and outbuildings anchored by a 1795 New England farmhouse - sits in 300 acres of breathtaking wildflower meadows, pine forests, lakes and orchards. Its sophisticated style is the result of a long and fruitful relationship with the cream of NYC's interior-design world. In the 1990s, the original owner, Hawaiian newspaperman Thurston Twigg-Smith, commissioned designer and one-time Warhol apostle Jed Johnson to work his magic on the first 15 rooms. Cue chinoiserie toile pelmets, hand-carved ravens atop barley-twist bedposts and a trompe-l'oeil tented ceiling. Johnson's rooms are still marvellous, but when Twin Farms added another five bedrooms in 2005, plus spa treatment rooms, architect Peter Bohlin (known for his Apple stores) and interior designer Thad Hayes were called in. Their suites - such as The Aviary, with its Douglas-fir panelling, shag rug and buttoned-leather headboard, all in orange - are as luxurious as Johnson's, though less zesty. As delightful as the rooms are, the farm-raised, seasonal food (veal with butternut-squash purée in winter, grilled halibut and prawn gnocchi in summer) from chef Ted Ask and pastry honcho Christopher Wilson possibly tops it all. There's also access to deserted hiking trails, private ski slopes, fly-fishing, the Out of the Woods Spa and a 20,000-bottle wine cellar.

For many travelers, a clean, comfortable room is all that's required for a relaxing stay. But for recent visitors to the Loden Hotel, it's the spotless, contemporary-styled bathrooms, complete with thick towels and ample space, that truly hit the mark. However, that's not to say the loos overshadowed the room's other amenities like the floor-to-ceiling windows, flat-screen TVs and plush bedding. Recent guests are also quick to praise the gracious hotel staff, who they describe as especially attentive. When guests aren't relaxing in their rooms, they're at the spa getting pampered with a massage or enjoying a meal at the on-site Tableau Bar Bistro. Visitors say the French-inspired plates and chic atmosphere can't be missed, but many guests are also quick to recommend Coal Harbour's eateries. If you want to explore more of the Vancouver food scene, you'll find plenty of restaurants around Stanley Park, just a mile and a half northwest of the hotel.
With a flotilla of boldfaced big-hitters hugging its sunny shores, Dubai isn’t exactly short of luxury digs. But what makes the newly opened Bulgari stand out is its location on its own seahorse-shaped manmade island, and its low-slung layout, a pleasing retort to the city’s ubiquitous canyons of skyscrapers. This is down to the group’s Milan-based architects, who anchored the hotel so it separates two bays: one an oh-so-quiet stretch of beach lined with villas; the other a super-smart marina with a sweep of restaurants and the Bulgari Yacht Club – a first for the brand. Structures are topped with layers of coral-like latticework; other marvellous textures that draw the eye include backlit green onyx, black granite and woollen Beni Ourain rugs from Morocco, picked out with covetable objects from B&B Italia and Flos. The city centre thrums on the other side of a 300-metre bridge, but with six bars and restaurants at the hotel, there really is no reason to cross it. La Spiaggia is a poolside crowd-pleaser that flips out wagyu beef burgers during the day, while in the evening, a Negroni from the oval Bulgari bar is a punchy aperitif for oysters and bottarga risotto at the neighbouring Niko Romito restaurant. The wow factor, though, is provided by the immense spa, with its ice fountains, hammam and an indoor pool – lined with a mosaic of real gold tiles, naturally – that has far-reaching views of the sea and the Dubai cityscape through floor-to-ceiling windows. The sense of contented wellbeing isn’t limited to the spa. In a land of hyperbole, this is understated perfection that thinks big. By Lauren Ho
Not only do Mr and Mrs Robert Wtterwulghe share an extraordinary surname, they also hold the world record for the most visits made by paying guests to One&Only Le Saint Géran. The Belgian couple made their 88th pilgrimage here this past year. Few hotels inspire such loyalty. When it opened in 1975 it was, if not the only place to stay in Mauritius, the only one you would have wished to stay in. Its proprietor, South African Sol Kerzner, announced his intention to ‘blow the guests away’. In a sense, he achieved the opposite. They came in droves. They are still coming in droves. These days it is not uncommon for three generations from the same family to arrive simultaneously. Now Mauritius has the greatest concentration of five-star hotels of any island in the Indian Ocean and yet Le Saint Géran has in no way been overtaken. The changes made during a 2017 makeover were uncontroversial, either merely cosmetic or merely sensible. The number of rooms has decreased, and they are the very definition of tasteful neutrality, taupe and teal, as soothing as a sea breeze. The spa has expanded and there’s a new pool. But the essentials remain the same. The location – on 60 acres with a mile of flawless beach – is unbeatable. The spangled Alice Temperley teepee is still available for seaside revels. The adored tree in the lobby continues to grow. By Steve King
Often referred to as the USA's best small hotel, this 20-suite Relais & Châteaux property - with cottages and outbuildings anchored by a 1795 New England farmhouse - sits in 300 acres of breathtaking wildflower meadows, pine forests, lakes and orchards. Its sophisticated style is the result of a long and fruitful relationship with the cream of NYC's interior-design world. In the 1990s, the original owner, Hawaiian newspaperman Thurston Twigg-Smith, commissioned designer and one-time Warhol apostle Jed Johnson to work his magic on the first 15 rooms. Cue chinoiserie toile pelmets, hand-carved ravens atop barley-twist bedposts and a trompe-l'oeil tented ceiling. Johnson's rooms are still marvellous, but when Twin Farms added another five bedrooms in 2005, plus spa treatment rooms, architect Peter Bohlin (known for his Apple stores) and interior designer Thad Hayes were called in. Their suites - such as The Aviary, with its Douglas-fir panelling, shag rug and buttoned-leather headboard, all in orange - are as luxurious as Johnson's, though less zesty. As delightful as the rooms are, the farm-raised, seasonal food (veal with butternut-squash purée in winter, grilled halibut and prawn gnocchi in summer) from chef Ted Ask and pastry honcho Christopher Wilson possibly tops it all. There's also access to deserted hiking trails, private ski slopes, fly-fishing, the Out of the Woods Spa and a 20,000-bottle wine cellar.
Since starting out in 1993 with one lodge, Singita has grown into an outfit that is now responsible for a million acres in five wild regions across three African countries. But what still matters most is the desire to preserve that pristine land and the animals that live on it. Its turbo-smart lodges and camps are scattered across private concessions in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Sasakwa, set in 140,000 hectares on the border of the Serengeti National Park, is the grandest of them all. Built from stone, it’s like a stately Edwardian manor house, with elegant colonial-era style: polished parquet floors, Persian carpets, chandeliers, bookshelf-lined walls, enormous fireplaces and a mix of African collectibles and European antiques. The service is faultless, orchestrated by Frank Louw, who started out as the executive chef many years ago and has dozens of stories to share about Tanzanian staff rising up through the ranks. As well as an entire reserve to explore, there’s tennis, archery, biking, hiking and top-notch treatments in the spa. Diet-defying meals are served wherever you want them, always with a view. Wines are plucked from the best of South Africa’s vineyards. Ten guest cottages each have separate living rooms, enormous bathrooms and private plunge pools. As impressive as all this is, though, the greatest draw is the exclusive game viewing – in the middle of a privately funded reserve that’s as big as the Maasai Mara. It continues to guarantee the survival of the western corridor of the annual migration of a million wildebeest, zebra and Thomson’s gazelle. And year-round, it provides the ultimate luxury to the lodge’s high-flying guests: not having to share wildlife sightings with anyone else. By Jane Broughton
Whether you are planning a honeymoon, a big adventure or just some much-needed relaxation, a Caribbean vacation can provide the trip you need. The incredible temperatures, year-round accessibility and proximity to Canada all make the Caribbean, Central and South America dream locations. Book a cheap hotel or a luxury package, knowing no matter which you choose, Travelocity can help you get the best rates available.

In a city awash with much-loved legends – the Cipriani, the Danieli, the Gritti Palace – it takes something special for a newcomer to turn heads. But Aman, which splashed down here in 2013, as ever, had a trump card: Palazzo Papadopoli. Not only is this 16th-century confection right on the Grand Canal, just past the Rialto Bridge – which guests whizz under in the hotel’s glossy Riva to arrive at the palazzo’s jetty flanked by cerulean bricole – but it has also been home for the last two centuries to the Arrivabene family. Proper Venetian aristocracy, the current count and countess (Giberto and Bianca) still live here with their five children in a sprawling apartment at the top of the building. Beneath it, the first-floor piano nobile – redesigned, along with the whole of the palazzo, in the early 19th century by master of rococo Michelangelo Guggenheim – is a breathtaking, silk-draped, gilded space lit by enormous Murano glass chandeliers. The 24 bedrooms have been slotted into many of the palazzo’s original spaces, so they are all unique. But the opulence does not compete with Jean-Michel Gathy’s minimalist B&B Italia furniture. The Clooneys settled on the Alcova Tiepolo room, with precious frescoes above the bed and a hand-painted Chinoiserie sitting room, for their wedding night. Outside are two private gardens – another rarity in Venice – one of which butts up against the canal’s edge, and soon to be home to a teppanyaki restaurant. This is hands down the most splendid hotel in Venice. By Fiona Kerr
This 32-room hotel may appear traditional thanks to its colonial facade, but guests know that the sleek Hotel Matilda is anything but: there’s a crazy video installation installed behind the front desk, and the hallways are lined with contemporary artwork. Once you get to your room, you’ll discover crisp white beds dressed with Egyptian cotton linens and adorned slate gray accents, and marble-clad bathrooms hstocked with Malin + Goetz products. The infinity pool and the rooftop bar, though, are the true standouts.

*Offer is subject to availability at time of reservation. A 7 day advance purchase. A minimum 2 night stay and a  full deposit will be taken 1 day prior to arrival. Offer includes a daily credit per room, per night which will be applied to the room folio in currency of the host hotel. Daily credit may be used at select food & beverage outlets, spas and golf courses as outlined in the complete terms and conditions. Reservations at participating outlets are highly recommended and should be made prior to arrival to ensure availability. Credit has no cash value and will only be applied to applicable charges on the room folio at time of check-out; unused credit will be forfeited. Credit cannot be applied towards daily room rate, taxes or gratuities. Any charges applied to the room folio that exceed the total credit amount or at non-participating outlets must be paid in full at time of check-out. This offer is subject to change without notice and cannot be combined with any other offer or promotion. Blackout dates apply.


For travelers who put a premium on luxury, the Rosewood Hotel Georgia delivers. Recent visitors said the staff's attention to detail makes guests feel like royalty. And the 156 rooms and suites aren't too shabby either: Accommodations feature views of the hotel's inner courtyard or the Vancouver cityscape, flat-screen TVs, Nespresso coffee makers and complimentary Wi-Fi. The bathrooms are just as impressive with rainforest shower fixtures and heated floors. For extra pampering, treat yourself to a visit at Sense, A Rosewood Spa. When hunger sets in, the swanky Reflections: The Garden Terrace (open during the warmer months), serves cocktails and small plates. Meanwhile, Hawksworth Restaurant features a formal atmosphere and a menu with locally inspired cuisine. But when just drinks will do, kick back at the 1927 Lobby Lounge, which borrows its name from the building's original construction in 1927. You'll find this Rosewood outpost in downtown Vancouver at the corner of Howe and West Georgia streets (around the corner from the Vancouver Art Gallery).
The friendly and thoughtful staff of the Hotel du Vieux-Québec will make you feel like in the comfort of your own home. This boutique hotel located in the heart of Old Quebec is surrounded by the ramparts. Its friendly staff will be happy to reveal you the many interesting sites nearby. The welcoming hotel rooms have a contemporary decor. You have the possibility of inviting your pet from November to April in the standard rooms. The owner is committed to reducing its environmental impact through many projects that have earned him numerous awards.
To become a member of our Club you must have first made a booking at Best Hotels through your trusted travel agency, our website or over the phone. To do so, the first step is to enter your booking reference, which is the number you will find on your confirmation email. Then you can enjoy many advantages during your stay. You can also ask for a card in the hotel you have chosen to visit when you arrive. We will send one to your address so you can start to enjoy many benefits on your next stay.

The fourth-generation, family-owned Hotel Continental is one of the oldest and most established hotels in Oslo—but it's not just its pedigree that makes it a notable stay. Located on the doorstep of some of the city's main tourist attractions, including the Royal Castle, the parade street Karl Johan, the National Gallery, the waterfront, and the Aker Brygge neighborhood, it's in a veritable hotbed of activity. The five-star spot caters to an accordingly upscale crowd, with plenty of business travelers in the mix, but there are also locals swinging by for pre-dinner cocktails at Bar Boman, the stylish hotel bar—so you won't feel at all sequestered from the scene.

Bold, crazy, ambitious, foolhardy, visionary – any number of adjectives could have been used to describe Australians Rory and Melita Hunter when they formulated their plan some 12 years ago to create a destination hotel on two tiny islands in the little-known Koh Rong archipelago, 20 miles off the coast of Cambodia. Yet the sublime result was Song Saa – the first opening outside of Siem Reap to rekindle an interest in travel to Cambodia after decades of oppression (their next project is 200-hectare Song Saa Reserve at Siem Reap). Nine of the 27 standalone villas (each with a private pool) are on stilted platforms over aquamarine water, the rest dotting the shoreline or tucked into the jungly interior of the larger island; the smaller island, linked via a wooden walkway, remains an unblemished nature reserve. But it’s Melita’s creative touch that really defines the look and feel of Song Saa: driftwood and bamboo from broken-up fishing boats and abandoned houses have been recycled into walls, floors and furniture. The Song Saa Foundation runs in conjunction with the hotel, championing health, employment and education among local communities, and tackles issues such as waste management and marine protection. So staying at this top-class island hideaway also means supporting social and environmental change. A meaningful blueprint for sustainable travel. By Pamela Goodman


You can compare all of our L'Ancienne-Lorette hotel rooms including the major L'Ancienne-Lorette hotel chains using our genuine Hotels.com guest reviews as well as TripAdvisor L'Ancienne-Lorette hotel reviews to help find the perfect hotel room when booking your accommodation in L'Ancienne-Lorette. We also feature Expedia L'Ancienne-Lorette hotels and reviews.

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This legendary hotel on Manhattan's Upper East Side has a highly developed sense of noblesse oblige. The Carlyle opened inauspiciously in 1930, the year after the Wall Street Crash, and its lobby retains the original black-and-white tiled floor designed by Dorothy Draper. The lift operator knows each guest's name and room number, handy should you return late and a little squiffy. And each room has a proper key: no troublesome cards or spooky 'iris recognition' here. The bedrooms themselves are generously sized - at least for New York - while the tower suites are positively vast and very beautiful, with pale beechwood parquet floors, Chinese cabinets, onyx lamps and silk-cushioned fauteuils, as well as heart-stopping views of Central Park. Refreshment is never far away: tea is served in the Ottoman-styled Gallery, cocktails in the Bemelmans Bar (the bar of the Upper East Side) and lunch or dinner in the Carlyle Restaurant, which is decorous without being sedate. And music is inherent at the Carlyle, whose first tenant was composer Richard Rodgers. In its public rooms and suites there are 14 baby grand pianos, and Woody Allen still plays jazz clarinet every Monday night, six months of the year, at the ground-floor Café Carlyle. But in the end, the Carlyle's brilliance lies in its understatement. The fire instructions say, 'Remain relaxed'. Here, at what is still New York's grandest hotel, it's hard to do anything else.
Situated on one of the best beaches in the world, the Royalton Bavaro Resort and Spa offers luxurious getaways in tropical Punta Cana. Great for memorable family escapes, there’s engaging programming for guests of all ages with daily activities at the supervised kids and teens clubs, as well as the fun-filled on-site splash pad and lazy river. Energetic travellers can stay active on the multi-sport court or with non-motorized water sports, such as snorkelling, kayaking and scuba diving. Or, if rest and relaxation are a top priority, the on-site spa is an ideal refuge with a range of massage, body and facial treatments, as well as a hydrotherapy circuit. In the evening, come together to enjoy eclectic cuisines, including buffet-style and à la carte dining venues featuring local and international delights. Afterwards, adult guests can try their luck at the on-site casino, or enjoy one of the many bars and lounges offering refreshing international drinks and cocktails.
Secluded among 157 acres of ancient trees and burbling streams, this Northern California retreat got raves from readers for its leafy privacy. The 48 “rooms” are actually cedar-and-glass cabins with huge views of the woods, along with fabulous outdoor living rooms, “bath gardens” and outdoor showers. Given the spa’s mud baths and private mineral-soaking pools, the resort also scored well with readers for its stress-relieving potential. 
If you’re looking for a hotel near Ginza, then consider the Hotel Sunroute Shimbashi which is just a 7-minute walk away. Rooms come with free WiFi, a flat-screen TV, mini-fridge, an electric kettle and an en suite bathroom with free toiletries. The front desk is open 24-hours, there’s free luggage storage, coin laundry, and some free drinks in the common area. The Shimbashi area has lots of great restaurants including izakayas which are open late. JR Shimbashi station is a 5-minute walk away while Haneda airport takes just 30-minutes to get to via the monorail.

Since starting out in 1993 with one lodge, Singita has grown into an outfit that is now responsible for a million acres in five wild regions across three African countries. But what still matters most is the desire to preserve that pristine land and the animals that live on it. Its turbo-smart lodges and camps are scattered across private concessions in South Africa, Zimbabwe and Tanzania. Sasakwa, set in 140,000 hectares on the border of the Serengeti National Park, is the grandest of them all. Built from stone, it’s like a stately Edwardian manor house, with elegant colonial-era style: polished parquet floors, Persian carpets, chandeliers, bookshelf-lined walls, enormous fireplaces and a mix of African collectibles and European antiques. The service is faultless, orchestrated by Frank Louw, who started out as the executive chef many years ago and has dozens of stories to share about Tanzanian staff rising up through the ranks. As well as an entire reserve to explore, there’s tennis, archery, biking, hiking and top-notch treatments in the spa. Diet-defying meals are served wherever you want them, always with a view. Wines are plucked from the best of South Africa’s vineyards. Ten guest cottages each have separate living rooms, enormous bathrooms and private plunge pools. As impressive as all this is, though, the greatest draw is the exclusive game viewing – in the middle of a privately funded reserve that’s as big as the Maasai Mara. It continues to guarantee the survival of the western corridor of the annual migration of a million wildebeest, zebra and Thomson’s gazelle. And year-round, it provides the ultimate luxury to the lodge’s high-flying guests: not having to share wildlife sightings with anyone else. By Jane Broughton


Twenty-six years on, Ellerman House is still everybody’s fantasy bolthole in Cape Town: minutes from the best beaches and the Table Mountain cableway, but close enough to the city and its dynamic food, art and design scene. Sandwiched between Lion’s Head and the Atlantic Ocean, the Cape Edwardian mansion looks like a private residence from the road, one of many overlooking the sea in the wind-protected suburb of Bantry Bay. And that’s exactly what keeps guests coming back. The bar, restaurant and spa are exclusive to invited and resident guests, which means it’s very private and secure. Owner Paul Harris takes enormous pride in his country – his impressive collection of South African art spans original works from the turn of the last century to current contemporary art. An informal tour of the collection with one of the in-house art experts is a fascinating lesson in the country’s socio-political history. Then there are the 7,500 bottles of rare and vintage South African wines in the cellar and the indigenous plants sourced from Kirstenbosch (Cape Town’s answer to Kew) in the one-and-a-half acre terraced gardens. Besides the main house, there are two modern, minimalist private villas built into the granite mountainside, as well as a wine gallery and an excellent little spa. Checking into one of the individually decorated rooms in the house – many with local African design elements, some on the small size – feels both comfortable and comforting. As does the open-access kitchen. Walk right in, tell the chefs what you’re craving and it is whipped up in minutes. Better yet, take a snack back to your room. The post-sunset vista from the balcony has to be one of the best views of the Atlantic found anywhere on earth. By Jane Broughton

Overlooking an untamed strip of Pacific coast on Vancouver Island (about 195 miles northwest of Victoria), the Wickaninnish Inn is a Relais & Châteaux luxury amid the pines. Guests adore this hotel's rugged setting and isolated locale. All guest rooms boast ocean views, and include balconies, fireplaces, soaker tubs and heated flooring in the bathrooms. Guests can dine on fine, locally-sourced fare at The Pointe Restaurant for Brunch and dinner while the Driftwood Cafe features drinks such as coffee and smoothies, snacks and lunch options. For a bit of relaxation, hotel guests suggest heading to Ancient Cedars Spa, which offers treatments like West Coast Sacred Sea body wraps, or grabbing a drink at sundown at the On The Rocks Bar. 
A two-hour drive north of Madrid will get you to this massive converted Baroque-Romanesque abbey surrounded by vineyards. Abadia's aesthetic feels medieval—in a good way—with vaulted ceilings, thick stone walls, and a silent cloister, minus the drafty bedrooms, ash-littered fireplaces, and drab brocade curtains. In their place are bright and airy pieces of modern furniture accented by warm wood and soaring windows, plus a one-starred Michelin restaurant, Refectorio. Examine the peeling frescoes while you make your way through a prix-fixe menu that might include smoked cauliflower soup and roasted squab with an artichoke and olive confit.
Old Hollywood glamour is on display throughout Hotel Bel-Air. Ranked as the No. 3 Best Hotel in Los Angeles for 2018, this chic property resides in the exclusive Bel Air Estates neighborhood and is home to a spa, an outdoor pool and a lake with four white swans. In addition to the hotel's quiet atmosphere, guests rave about the property's stunning accommodations, which let in ample natural light and offer high-end features, such as marble bathrooms and private entrances. Many also praise the hotel's attentive staff. (Courtesy of Hotel Bel-Air)
A long weekend coming up? Look nowhere other than Yatra to make the most of your trip and also get a value for your money. Under the latest offer there is up to 70% instant discount and an additional 20% cash-back in your Yatra Wallet on renowned Chains and Budget hotels across the participating destinations. Choose from the mentioned destination, make use of the Yatra hotel coupons by applying the coupon code while making the booking, and get a great hotel deal.
The Inn & Club at Harbour Town, the No. 1 Best Hotel in Hilton Head, sits on 5,000 oceanfront acres within The Sea Pines Resort. Guests heap praise on this elegant property, especially its welcoming staff and well-appointed rooms. All 60 accommodations offer 480 square feet of space, Nespresso coffee makers, walk-in rain showers and blackout curtains. Plus, all room rates cover two hours of daily court time at the on-site tennis club, reduced green fees at the property's three golf courses and preferred reservations at the on-site restaurants, among other perks. (Courtesy of The Sea Pines Resort and Rob Tipton)
Recipients: The data will be communicated to the Hotels’ management companies in order to handle the exclusive offers, discounts and promotions that you will receive as a member of the BestHotels Club. The data will not be transferred to third parties unless said transfer is necessary to handle the advantages enjoyed by the members of the BestHotels Club or is required by law.
The Lowell is conveniently situated near Fifth Avenue and Central Park on the Upper East Side. Offering 74 rooms and suites with cashmere throws, king-sized beds and pantries or kitchenettes stocked with Dean & DeLuca snacks, this boutique property also features an array of drinking and dining venues, including the elegant Majorelle, the oak-paneled Jacques Bar and the cozy Club Room. And no visit to the No. 2 Best Hotel in New York City would be complete without sitting for afternoon tea in the Pembroke Room. (Courtesy of The Lowell Hotel New York)
According to recent visitors, the best thing about the Trump International Hotel & Tower New York is the service, from its white-gloved bellhops to its personal 24-hour Trump Attaché service. Along with the attentive hotel staff, the spacious accommodations, the 6,000-square-foot spa and the world-class cuisine served at the on-site restaurants also earn praise from guests. This Trump property earns the No. 6 Best Hotel in New York City title for 2017. (Courtesy of Trump International Hotel & Tower New York)
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Two are indisputably better than one at the Belmond Hotel Splendido and Belmond Splendido Mare, a dual-property entity sitting high above Portofino cove. Both halves carry with them a bit of history: the 670-room Hotel Splendido was once a 16th-century monastery known for withstanding attacks from Saracen pirates, while the other, 16-room “Mare” half sits on the piazzetta, a respite from the lively Ligurian harbor. Outside, fragrant bundles of wisteria and straight-backed juniper bushes flank its winding cobblestone walkways, while rooms mostly come with terra-cotta-tiled terraces where you can take your morning cappuccino—some offer up stunning panoramic views of the cove.
Visitors can take advantage of all the Holy City has to offer at the No. 2 Best Hotel in Charleston: The Dewberry Charleston. Ideally positioned on downtown's Meeting Street, the hotel puts guests near the city's top things to do, including the Charleston City Market and the Battery. For attractions farther afield, travelers can make use of the hotel's complimentary bicycles or one of its Volvo house cars. Back at the hotel, lodgers have access to yoga classes, a restaurant and a spa, as well as in-room amenities like high-definition televisions. (Courtesy of The Dewberry Charleston)
While thoughts of Ontario may start with Toronto, you'll find its cousin, Brampton, to be cheaper when it comes to accommodations. Brampton, Ontario, Canada, offers several cheap hotels that leave you with enough cash in hand to explore in and around the city. The Best Western Plus Brampton provides you with amenities such as a pool, free breakfast, and complimentary Wi-Fi, all for $75 per night. Staying just outside a major city will leave you with more to spend on the rest of your vacation.
Before Buenos Aires surrendered to the motor car – and every Argentine male modelled his ego on that of Formula One legend Juan Manuel Fangio – Avenida Alvear was one of the city’s main thoroughfares, with horse-drawn carriages and trams rolling by en route to Palermo’s lush gardens and shady parks. Something of this Belle Epoque spirit still endures and nowhere more so than at the Palacio Duhau, completed in 1934 as the city mansion of a landed family. Its grand neoclassical façade is right on the avenue, and the lobby is a stately, serene space where light pours in from the terrace onto the fluted marble columns, intricately carved wooden doors and low-slung white leather sofas. The tiered gardens on the terrace are worthy of a scene in The Great Gatsby. Rooms range from spacious and functional to sumptuous and palatial; the boudoir suite has butler service, an enormous marble bathroom and, perhaps more impressive, two private terraces overlooking the avenue below. The Duhau restaurant and public spaces channel the property’s storied glamour, with local couples having lunch and out-of-towners sipping rum-laced Arnaud’s milk-punch cocktails. The surrounding barrio of Recoleta is known for its old-world architecture, and this hotel, modelled on the Château du Marais near Paris, is the maximum expression of Argentine Francophilia. Its only rival on this stately strip is the Alvear Palace – but where the latter flaunts its ostentation, the Hyatt’s grandest South American property rather keeps itself to itself. By Chris Moss

Sala Rattanakosin is a beautiful boutique hotel which offers one of the best views in the city, overlooking the river and directly opposite Wat Arun, also known as the Temple of Dawn.The hotel has that rustic yet modern feel with brick walls and smooth lines.This is a small hotel, with only 17 rooms, meaning you get attentive service as well as peace and quiet.There are five room types, starting with the standard.For a view of Wat Pho or the River View, there is a small selection of deluxe rooms.All guestrooms are decorated in a simple modern monochrome palette, with hot showers in the en suite bathrooms, flat screen televisions, air conditioning, a mini bar and hot drinks making facilities. Read More...
Book between November 26, 2018 – March 31, 2019 for stays between January 7, 2019 – December 31, 2019 on the Suite Moments Package to receive suite accommodation (daily rate), complimentary breakfast for two (2) and a complimentary welcome Classics. Perfected. cocktail per guest. A non-refundable minimum two night (2) stay is required. This offer is subject to availability of rooms at time of booking. Offer does not apply to existing bookings. Subject to change without notice and cannot be combined with any other promotions or offers. Advance reservations are required. Rates are listed in the currency of the host hotel, per room, per night based on double occupancy; taxes and gratuities not included.

This spa resort doesn't take any of its five stars for granted, particularly when it comes to delivering first-rate customer service. Recent guests can't help but keep the compliments coming: Travelers say that the resort staff took extra care to personalize each experience. One problem you might face, however, is exclusivity. The Acqualina Resort & Spa on the Beach only has 98 guest rooms and suites, so be sure to book early for an upcoming trip to Sunny Isles Beach. The rooms come with flat-screen TVs and private balconies, as well as double sinks and glass-enclosed showers. Meanwhile, the property also features three in-house eateries, four pools, a spa and beach amenities. What's more, the hotel is part of The Leading Hotels of the World, meaning Leaders Club members have access to perks here. You'll find the Acqualina Resort & Spa in Sunny Isles Beach, Florida, about 11 miles north of Miami Beach.
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